Category Archives: presentation

Ecology and Teaching at SXSW!!

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I’m looking forward to setting off for Austin, Texas on Sunday for a week of SXSWedu talks, meetings, and conversation….not to mention the predicted 75-degree temps!

I’ll be giving one of the Future 20 talks at 11:30 on Thursday, March 9th about Ecology as a Model for Teaching.

Here’s the presentation description:

Grounded in a pedagogy of interdependence, collaboration and co-evolution, this talk will outline essential methods and tools necessary to integrate ecological systems thinking into curricular and instructional design. Building curricula based on ecological models helps to focus on organic, open and engaged learning experiences that coalesce around learning outcomes, around ‘real-world’ ecological challenges and around learner-centered approaches — where the boundaries between student, teacher and the world all blur and begin to evolve into a new paradigm of an intentionally engaged ecology.

If you’re in the area, stop on by!

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Telling stories

Last Tuesday, I gave a presentation about Climate Run: Iceland at Sterling College. In many ways it seems like a long time since I finished my trans-Icelandic run in June 2015 — but sharing the story of my passion for running, training, and sharing ideas about embracing vulnerability as a way to build climate resilience — all of this helps me to stay connected with the experience and with all the people who I have talked with over the last year. And it gets me up at 4:00 am nearly every day to keep training for what comes next.

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One student asked me what kept me going despite some of the challenges I faced along the 150-mile run. I thought for a minute and then explained that I was never in it by myself — I had family, friends, and many people I’d never even met supporting me, following my progress, and wanting to share in my adventure. Even when I was 20 miles from the next nearest person in the middle of northern Icelandic tundra, I never felt completely alone.

I’m excited to have the chance to share my story on November 4th at 7:00 pm at the Whitney Community Center in Jackson, NH.

I hope you can join me for an evening of stories, pictures, and conversation about how we can build communities of resilience in the face of climate change.

 

 

 

Ecology as a Model for Teaching

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I love it when synergy happens. And in my world, it seems to happen all the time. Like this, for example — I’ve proposed a workshop for the SXSWedu Conference and Festival next March that integrates my love of teaching, ecology, design, systems, and of course running!

The talk will “outline the essential methods and tools necessary to integrate ecological systems thinking into curricular and instructional design.”

In a nutshell, it’s all about how to integrate *what* we teach about–like the natural world, ecology, and climate resilience–into *how* we teach about it.

Want to know more?

You can find the proposal  — and, most importantly, vote for it — here!

Always learning: lessons from students

I’ve had a couple of terrific experiences with students over the past few weeks– from teaching a two-week intensive class titled Resilience, Complexity, and Flow at Sterling College–to meeting with hundreds of students at Cannon School in Concord, NC last week.

Each of these gave me a chance to have some powerful and important conversations about what it means to be resilient, and how being vulnerable can be a way to become more powerful in the face of a changing climate and changing world.

My Sterling class ended with a conversation about perception and the precarity of balancing between self and place. We are always, the students seemed to agree, both within the world and at its margins–there isn’t really any terra firma on which to stand and assess the world, as we are bound to it, ever in flux.

This didn’t mean, for most students, that there was no meaningful path forward. In fact, the path ahead seems clearer–in a world already pushing (and even beyond) the limits of social and ecological capacity and sustainability, by better understanding the complexity our world and by embracing our own vulnerability can we begin to build a more resilient future.

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After my presentation to middle school students at Cannon School, I was peppered with so many questions that we ran out of time! The students were so excited by my experience of running across Iceland and seemed to be looking for ways to connect Climate Run to their own experience of the world, that I could have talked with them all day!

It struck me that this was exactly why I was doing this–not only to share my experiences of endurance running and of seeing the effects of climate change firsthand, but to continue the conversation and to share and learn more about ideas of resilience and vulnerability from everyone I talk with–whether that’s a group of a dozen college students, or a room of 75 outdoor enthusiasts at the Green Mountain Club, or several hundred middle schoolers in North Carolina.

What I learn from each of these encounters can be just as meaningful and powerful as enduring hour mile after mile of unforgiving Arctic terrain.

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Rainbow from the top of Kaldidalur Pass

What’s Next…?

 

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Den längsta resan är resan inåt.
               -Dag Hammarskjöld

I talked about Climate Run: Iceland this morning with about thirty middle school students at the Albany Community School here in Vermont. Among the questions they asked during and after my slideshow was “what was your favorite part?”

I had just answered another question — “was it fun?” — by saying that overall the whole experience was life changing, incredible, and, occasionally even fun. Lots of the actual experience running was not what I’d call fun (…maybe Type II Fun). So it was harder still to come up with one favorite part.

This was the first time I’d been asked that, so I thought for a second before answering.

“This right here. Talking with all of you.”

Right now, my greatest adventure is sharing the story of Climate Run: Iceland and having many profound, moving, and motivating conversations about climate change, resilience, endurance, and vulnerability. I’m excited to keep up the momentum this message has begun.

All that said, though, I have been training hard all fall and winter–with the help of my coach, Jack Pilla–getting ready for a lot of terrific events over the coming year, but here are four of my standout distance races for 2016:

March 19-20
24 Hours of Bolton ski mountaineering race (approx. 80-100k ascent & descent).
Bolton, VT
Note: This race is a fundraiser for Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sport. Please visit my giving page if you’re interested in helping out. 

April 16
Traprock 50 km trail race
Simsbury, CT

June 4
Cayuga Trails 50 mile race
Ithaca, NY

August 20
Leadville Trail 100 Run 
Leadville, CO

…and Climate Run 2017? I’ve whittled it down to a short list. Stay tuned! 🙂

Resonance

Over the past couple of months, I have been giving Climate Run: Iceland presentations around Vermont and the eastern U.S — from talks at Burlington, Vermont’s The Outdoor Gear Exchange, Mount Mansfield Nordic Ski Club, to a standing-room-only audience at The Catamount Trail Association, and to a packed auditorium at the Hathaway Brown School in Cleveland, Ohio.

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descending from Hengill midway through day one

It’s always exciting to share my story of running across Iceland (which for me feels both recent and so very long ago), but I find even more rewarding the conversations that follow–about a range of topics grounded in concepts such as climate change, resilience, vulnerability, and endurance.

I’ve been asked, “what should we do” in the face of climate change? What roles should we as athletes play? How do you define resilience?

I have facilitated a conversation about the role of faith in climate conversations.

I have asked groups about how privilege can guide our thinking about vulnerability.

I have talked with students and faculty about how art, action, and science can help develop a resilient ecological and social relationship.

I have found that my story resonates with a range of different audiences — from skiers to conservationists to high school students — all of whom have different expectations and different relationships with and perspectives on the natural world.

John Meyer has recently written about the resonance dilemma, which points to the disconnect between systems as large and complex as the global climate with individual people’s actions. Meyer invites us to “imagine an agenda for environmental sustainability that emerges from everyday concerns and is … deeply resonant with the lives of” ordinary people.

I completely agree. In fact, Climate Run often resonates most strongly when I talk about the personal experience of being in the midst of wildness–and of realizing that as individuals we are inextricably part of a global ecology.

Nature can no longer be that place ‘out there.’ For the issues of a broader world to resonate with us, we need to recognize–and act as though–we are part of it all.

Of course, this is not at all a new concept, but it may be among the most difficult to act upon.

celebrating at the finish in Laugarbakki

celebrating at the finish in Laugarbakki after 150 miles

Climate Run hits the road!

I’m super stoked to kick off the Climate Run: Iceland tour with a show at the Outdoor Gear Exchange in Burlington, Vermont on Thursday, Sept. 24th at 8:00 pm.

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If you are interested in hosting a presentation where you are, please get in touch! More info about Climate Run presentations.