Tag Archives: support

Skida Hats! A new way to support Climate Run

I’m super excited to have partnered with Skida¬†to bring you lightweight Climate Run hats in so many amazing spring colors. Each hat is made right here in Vermont by the fantastic folks at Skida, and each one has a sewn Climate Run label so you can show your support.

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These are perfect for cold morning & evening workouts and are a cool way of joining the Climate Run team and showing your support. Want one? Just head over to my Paypal donation page. Each hat is $30, and once you click submit, I’ll be in touch and get your color preference & shipping info.

If you want to add more to help cover postage, or are just feeling extra generous, please feel free ūüôā

Note that there are two different sizes: Women’s, which are a bit smaller and men’s, which are larger. The snowflake Skida logo denotes the women’s styles and the mountain logo the men’s.

Thanks so much!

Climate Run 500-Mile Challenge!

With just over 7 months until the start of the Arctic Trail Run, I want to share the fun of training with everyone else!

I’m also feeling more than a little inspired from yesterday morning’s November Project workout¬†in downtown Boston — training is starting to ramp up, with increasing Sunday long run mileage, scheduled cross training, and some run/ski doubles mid-week — and I want to invite you to join me!

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It’s beginning to look a lot like fitness…

So, I’m inviting you to join the Climate Run Team! Starting on January 1st, 2017, I challenge you to run, walk, or ski 500 miles by August 16th¬†as a way to get moving, get in touch with the world around us, and learn about how we impact the environment, climate, and help build a resilient self and resilient community.

500 miles?!?!

Yep!¬†That comes to about 2.2 miles a¬†day — or about 15 miles each week. See? No problem!

Where do I sign up?

On the Climate Run 500-mile Challenge Facebook Group. Go ahead and join, introduce yourself, make your intention clear and get going ūüôā

Do I have to run?

Nope! Human powered activities like walking and nordic / uphill skiing work just fine. The more you can do on trails, the better!

How do I  record my miles?

First, you can record them on your own. I love using my Believe Training Journal to help me get a handle on my progress, and the prompts are really great.

Second, join the Climate Run Strava Group to record your miles and see how everyone else is doing.

Post goals, pictures, and inspirations on Climate Run Facebook Page to share your accomplishments!

Is that it? What else do I do? 

The mission of Climate Run is to engage bodily movement as a way to build resilience in the face of a changing climate. 

What does this mean? It means that by participating, you commit to learning about the impacts of climate change and sharing what you learn — both through your physical engagement with the world as you move toward your 500-mile goal — *and* ¬†through what you read, see, and learn about the climate.

Why August 16th, 2017?

That’s the day I plan to reach the end of the Arctic Trail in Kautekeino, Norway, having run the 500 miles from Sulitjelma.

Will it cost anything?

Nope! Just a little time and dedication. Of course, if you choose to support the Climate Run project, that’d be awesome. And, in a few short weeks, there’ll be all kinds of great stuff you could get to show your support — including 100% recycled shirts from Atayne & Vermont-made hats from Skida.

Any other rules?

Not really. Just that your walk / run / ski is intentional and not just incidental as part of your everyday routine. Can you bike? Of course! I love biking. But those miles don’t count as part of your 500. Just walking, running, and skiing.

I’m super excited to share the training and goal-setting with as many people as possible! The more people who are involved in this project, the more we can change the story of climates, communities, and

Also, in a self-serving way, having partners helps me to stay focused and motivated on this long, long-term goal!

More soon!

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Dispatches for Iceland #6: Wesfjords Reflections & Recovery

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At long last–the finish at Laugarbakki with my brother Michal and brother-in-law Brion.

It has been one week since I completed my run¬†across Iceland to bring attention to¬†climate resilience, and I’ve spent much of that time recovering, replenishing calories with¬†seafood, lamb, and¬†skyr, and taking some tentative and recuperative steps on the trails, snowfields, and beaches around Isafjordur and Flateyri here in the Westfjords.

 

The Climate Run¬†was easily¬†the greatest¬†endurance challenge that I’ve ever faced. I covered 240 km (about 150 miles) in just under 45 hours of running (and a few hours of sleep), climbed and descended a total of¬†6,000 meters (20,000 feet), ran solo stretches of up to 35 miles, and consumed a steady diet of Pocket Fuel and Nuun, both of which turned out to¬†be¬†essential pieces of the endurance nutrition puzzle for me — particularly on the long stretch of tundra north of the Icelandic highlands.

The project–from planning to preparation to completion–would not have been possible were it not for a dedicated support team here in Iceland: family and friends who provided logistical and emotional support, foot massages and wraps, delicious sandwiches and soup, and and-of-stage pacing without which I may well have curled up by the side of the trail many miles before the finish.

I am forever grateful and humbled by all the help I got both on the ground in Iceland and from the project’s many sponsors and supporters over the past year.

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Looking back towards Eiriksj√∂kull across Arnavatnshe√įi

As I mentioned in an earlier post, the Climate Run route changed from my original plan to run the Kj√∂lur Route to a route a little farther west across the Kaldidalur pass. This route took me¬†from the start on a beach of black volcanic sand near Thorlaksh√∂fn, over the crater of the Hengill volcano, through the national park at Thingvellir, across the Kaldidalur pass, and over the Arnavatnshe√įi tundra and to Laugerbakki and Mi√įfj√∂√įur on the north coast.

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Cooling my heels in the cold water of the north

I am more than happy with the outcome. Although the route was a few miles shorter than originally planned, the terrain was more challenging and included more trail (and even off-trail) miles.

As I write this post in the caf√© at Borea Adventures in Isafjor√įur, I finally have some time to start to put together some¬†thoughts about what I learned about resilience, running, climate, family, and community–all of which I believe are essential pieces of the broader ecological system of which we are always a part.

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rainbow from the top of Kaldidalur

I have already presented on Climate Run twice–once here at the University Centre of the Westfjords in Isafjor√įur, and once at the Arctic Encounters conference in Roskilde Denmark–and I hope this run and the stories, pictures and video¬†(thanks largely to the tireless¬†work of Jill Fineis Photography) that come from it are just the very start of an ongoing and powerful story of climate resilience and of our relationship to place and to one another.

58 days left . . . & I need your help!

There are 58 days left before I start off on my trans-Icelandic run!

58 days to goSpring has finally arrived — our long (long) winter’s snows are receding into the shadows as the streams and rivers swell and crocuses unfurl in the warming sun.

Soon, Orion and I will be setting off on our adventure in Scandinavia–from Bergen to Copenhagen to Reykjavik–and at 8:00 am on June 15th, I’ll take a last look at Iceland’s southern coast and turn northward toward the Kj√∂lur plateau, some 60 miles inland, and to Thingeyrar, where I hope to arrive by the middle of that week.

As the months of training and planning start to come down to weeks and days, I’ve been looking ahead to after the run–to how I can best share the story of Climate Run and of climate resilience among the outdoor recreation community and among athletes the world over.

Part of telling the story will include photos and video to complement the presentations, web, and print publications that I have started to plan (already scheduled are talks in Denmark, Iceland, and across New England in late summer).

I am appealing to friends and supporters once again before setting off on this Great Adventure to help me tell the story of climate resilience, of the trans-Icelandic run to help us grow a resilience among the athletic and outdoor recreation community.

How can you help?

There are 4 ways you can help with this final push:

  1. Contribute to the ongoing GoFundMe campaign!¬†Even $1 will help…and for $5 I’ll send you a personal thank you and a Climate Run sticker!
  2. Buy a 100% recycled U.S. made t-shirt from Atayne. $10 of every purchase goes directly to Climate Run!
  3. Use the link on right side of this page to make a direct donation via PayPal.
  4. Spread the word! Share the story of Climate Run on Twitter, Facebook, and everywhere else you can think of!

Thanks so much for all the support!

-Pavel (& Dragon : ) 

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Climate Run Tech T-Shirts!

I’m excited to share that through Climate Run’s collaboration with Atayne, we’re able to offer Climate Run logo short and long-sleeve tech t-shirts!

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The shirts are available in mens and womens¬†in both Hybrid and High Performance REC styles — all made of 100% recycled polyester — as well as Hybrid long sleeve.

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Fully $10 of every purchase goes directly to support Climate Run. What better way to show your support and help spread the message about Athletes and Climate Resilience.

Visit the Atayne Climate Run store for more details.

 

Supporter Spotlight: Brio Coffeeworks and Squirrel Stash Nuts

I’m so excited to announce that Kj√∂lur Run and Athletes for Climate Resilience is now supported by two fantastic Burlington, Vermont area purveyors of locally-produced yumminess — Brio Coffeeworks and Squirrel Stash Nuts!

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Brio roasts some of the tastiest beans that owners Magda and Nate Van Dusen can find. I learned more about coffee in a few visits to their roastery than I’ve learned in decades of being a 2-4 cup a day devotee ; ). I’m stoked to have Brio coffee to fuel those early morning training runs!

Check out their website, Facebook page, and Twitter for word about where to find their coffees, or stop by their Pine Street roastery.

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For the past year or so, Squirrel Stash has been roasting several tasty varieties of almonds, cashews, peanuts, and pecans. Their recent pairing of Burlington Beer Company ale,¬†cane syrup, cinnamon, and¬†maple and cashews has resulted in the pretty amazing Buzzed–my favorite! ¬†I’m also pretty keen on their compostable and eco-friendly packaging.

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Nuts & nut butters are my go-to fuel for running–and for just about anything, really, so I’m very excited to have SSN’s support to help me train through the winter spring. Follow them on Facebook for the latest!

Thanks, Brad and Meag : ) !