Category Archives: Climate Run Tour

Goals

One of the season’s first forays onto dry trails at Cady Hill, Stowe, Vermont


With the transition from the spring to summer semesters here at Sterling College, the trails have dried out, the sun rises earlier, and it’s been easier to find a few more hours in the week to focus on training. The Sterling running team has started 5:00 am summer practices three times each week, which has helped add more miles and more hill workouts into my weekly regimen.

Some students are starting out and running trails for the first time, some training for the upcoming Mount Washington Road Race, and some have longer term goals. Each person’s goals are unique, of course — from running a mile to completing a race to running across a small (or medium-sized!) country — the actual goal doesn’t matter.

What matters more is that we find meaning and intention in the goals we do build, and keep close those whose strength can help support us. A good friend recently asked me how I could find such focus on resilience and hope. So much so that my vehicle for doing so — running — has become a central part of my life — and the processes of training, planning, organizing, mentoring, and sharing stories of both adventure and climate.

When I leave for Norway in mid-July, I know that I’ll have the support of family, friends — so many new friends who have helped to support this work. I’m looking forward to meeting with new friends along the Arctic Trail and during stops in Svalbard, Tromsø, Bodø, Kautokeino, and elsewhere.

My goal, huge as it may seem, is at its heart really simple: I am just trying to figure out the best way that I can contribute to building meaningful communities and having thoughtful conversations.

And running has become a way for me to do just that.

From a recent training run on Mount Elmore, Vermont

New Shirts and Swag from Atayne!

I’m super excited to announce that Climate Run: Arctic Trail gear is now available in the Atayne Climate Run store!  

Not only do proceeds from the sales go directly to support the record attempt at the 500-mile Arctic Trail in August, and not only are the shirts made from 100% recycled polyester by the great folks at Atayne in Brunswick, Maine–but just look at these shirts!!

 

Fundraising for Climate Run 2017

The GoFundMe page for Climate Run: Arctic Trail has launched!!!

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I’m excited to be moving forward with planning for the Arctic Trail run, but I really can’t do it without everyone’s support. Please check out the campaign page for more details and donate if you can.

Thanks so much!

 

 

 

local steps & global reach

I was honored to give talks about Climate Run: Iceland at both Sterling College and at the Whitney Center in Jackson, NH over the past month — with great conversations and new ideas at every turn!

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While continuing to talk about Iceland and my upcoming 2017 Arctic Trail Run in Scandinavia, I’ve been ramping up the running with Sterling’s Trail, Mountain, Ultra Running Team. This coming weekend, 14 of us are headed to the Wolf Hollow 5k and half marathon in southern New Hampshire, and in two weeks, we will travel to Massachusetts to compete in the TARC Winter Fells 32 mile ultra run.

It’s super exciting to work with so many talented and passionate young runners — to help them reach their training or racing goals, sharing new experiences, and often, just trying to keep up!  Sterling is a small enough college that I see many of our student-athletes on the trails as well as in class and elsewhere on campus, and I love how often a conversation about running will be relevant in an environmental philosophy class — and vice versa.

Trying to keep pace with a team of 19 to 29-year-old runners totally inspires me to get stronger — and it’s great to feel myself moving forward in training while keeping both the near-term local goals as well as next summer’s 500-mile objective in sight.

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CR 2017: Arctic Trail — Stickers!!!

Who doesn’t love stickers? 🙂

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You can get some cool, bright, all-weather stickers *and* support the 2017 Climate Run: Arctic Trail at the same time!

I’ll send you one for only $3 — Just click here. 

If you want more than one (they make great holiday gifts!), then just add $1 — or more 🙂 Any donation is greatly appreciated and goes directly into funding Climate Run.

Thanks!

 

Always learning: lessons from students

I’ve had a couple of terrific experiences with students over the past few weeks– from teaching a two-week intensive class titled Resilience, Complexity, and Flow at Sterling College–to meeting with hundreds of students at Cannon School in Concord, NC last week.

Each of these gave me a chance to have some powerful and important conversations about what it means to be resilient, and how being vulnerable can be a way to become more powerful in the face of a changing climate and changing world.

My Sterling class ended with a conversation about perception and the precarity of balancing between self and place. We are always, the students seemed to agree, both within the world and at its margins–there isn’t really any terra firma on which to stand and assess the world, as we are bound to it, ever in flux.

This didn’t mean, for most students, that there was no meaningful path forward. In fact, the path ahead seems clearer–in a world already pushing (and even beyond) the limits of social and ecological capacity and sustainability, by better understanding the complexity our world and by embracing our own vulnerability can we begin to build a more resilient future.

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After my presentation to middle school students at Cannon School, I was peppered with so many questions that we ran out of time! The students were so excited by my experience of running across Iceland and seemed to be looking for ways to connect Climate Run to their own experience of the world, that I could have talked with them all day!

It struck me that this was exactly why I was doing this–not only to share my experiences of endurance running and of seeing the effects of climate change firsthand, but to continue the conversation and to share and learn more about ideas of resilience and vulnerability from everyone I talk with–whether that’s a group of a dozen college students, or a room of 75 outdoor enthusiasts at the Green Mountain Club, or several hundred middle schoolers in North Carolina.

What I learn from each of these encounters can be just as meaningful and powerful as enduring hour mile after mile of unforgiving Arctic terrain.

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Rainbow from the top of Kaldidalur Pass

What’s Next…?

 

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Den längsta resan är resan inåt.
               -Dag Hammarskjöld

I talked about Climate Run: Iceland this morning with about thirty middle school students at the Albany Community School here in Vermont. Among the questions they asked during and after my slideshow was “what was your favorite part?”

I had just answered another question — “was it fun?” — by saying that overall the whole experience was life changing, incredible, and, occasionally even fun. Lots of the actual experience running was not what I’d call fun (…maybe Type II Fun). So it was harder still to come up with one favorite part.

This was the first time I’d been asked that, so I thought for a second before answering.

“This right here. Talking with all of you.”

Right now, my greatest adventure is sharing the story of Climate Run: Iceland and having many profound, moving, and motivating conversations about climate change, resilience, endurance, and vulnerability. I’m excited to keep up the momentum this message has begun.

All that said, though, I have been training hard all fall and winter–with the help of my coach, Jack Pilla–getting ready for a lot of terrific events over the coming year, but here are four of my standout distance races for 2016:

March 19-20
24 Hours of Bolton ski mountaineering race (approx. 80-100k ascent & descent).
Bolton, VT
Note: This race is a fundraiser for Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sport. Please visit my giving page if you’re interested in helping out. 

April 16
Traprock 50 km trail race
Simsbury, CT

June 4
Cayuga Trails 50 mile race
Ithaca, NY

August 20
Leadville Trail 100 Run 
Leadville, CO

…and Climate Run 2017? I’ve whittled it down to a short list. Stay tuned! 🙂

Top Ten!

Five days into the New Year (and barely a week into “winter” here in the Northeastern U.S.) and I’m starting to adjust to a new training routine that balances running and skiing (and gym workouts) with all the other parts of family & work life.

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dragon waits…

For example, I couldn’t get out to start my long run on Sunday until after 5:00 pm. It was, of course, already dark, and snowing pretty hard. I put on the microspikes, harnessed Dragon for some canine companionship, and set out for a slow and steady 12 miles.

Slower than usual in part because of the double (& triple) workout days I’ve been logging this past week to take advantage of the new snow and keep ramping up the running mileage.

Stretching the training hours through the darkest days of the year and in all sorts of conditions has also given me plenty of time to think about being named one of Vermont’s Top Ten Athletes of 2015 by Vermont Sports Magazine.

It’s a huge honor–and pretty humbling–to be on a short list with athletes including Kasie Enman, Andy Newell, Kelly Clark, and Hannah Kearney.VS-dec.-webcover

Being on this list has also challenged me to think about what it means to be an athlete (and father and husband and teacher and more…), and it’s given me the chance to share the story of Climate Run and the idea of climate resilience with everyone from skiers to college students to 13-year olds studying climate science.

As much as I cherish all the hours I spend running, skiing, and training for the coming year’s adventures, even more important are the many conversations I’ve been able to have about endurance, vulnerability, resilience, and our individual roles in the face of climate change.

Resonance

Over the past couple of months, I have been giving Climate Run: Iceland presentations around Vermont and the eastern U.S — from talks at Burlington, Vermont’s The Outdoor Gear Exchange, Mount Mansfield Nordic Ski Club, to a standing-room-only audience at The Catamount Trail Association, and to a packed auditorium at the Hathaway Brown School in Cleveland, Ohio.

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descending from Hengill midway through day one

It’s always exciting to share my story of running across Iceland (which for me feels both recent and so very long ago), but I find even more rewarding the conversations that follow–about a range of topics grounded in concepts such as climate change, resilience, vulnerability, and endurance.

I’ve been asked, “what should we do” in the face of climate change? What roles should we as athletes play? How do you define resilience?

I have facilitated a conversation about the role of faith in climate conversations.

I have asked groups about how privilege can guide our thinking about vulnerability.

I have talked with students and faculty about how art, action, and science can help develop a resilient ecological and social relationship.

I have found that my story resonates with a range of different audiences — from skiers to conservationists to high school students — all of whom have different expectations and different relationships with and perspectives on the natural world.

John Meyer has recently written about the resonance dilemma, which points to the disconnect between systems as large and complex as the global climate with individual people’s actions. Meyer invites us to “imagine an agenda for environmental sustainability that emerges from everyday concerns and is … deeply resonant with the lives of” ordinary people.

I completely agree. In fact, Climate Run often resonates most strongly when I talk about the personal experience of being in the midst of wildness–and of realizing that as individuals we are inextricably part of a global ecology.

Nature can no longer be that place ‘out there.’ For the issues of a broader world to resonate with us, we need to recognize–and act as though–we are part of it all.

Of course, this is not at all a new concept, but it may be among the most difficult to act upon.

celebrating at the finish in Laugarbakki

celebrating at the finish in Laugarbakki after 150 miles

Climate Run hits the road!

I’m super stoked to kick off the Climate Run: Iceland tour with a show at the Outdoor Gear Exchange in Burlington, Vermont on Thursday, Sept. 24th at 8:00 pm.

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If you are interested in hosting a presentation where you are, please get in touch! More info about Climate Run presentations.